OUR STORY

5th Generation Family-Owned Farm

The farm was first homesteaded by our great great grandfather Frank Nordman around 1902.  It was designed to be a self sustaining farm with a barn for livestock, chicken coop to raise chickens, smoke house to smoke and preserve meats, ice house to preserve ice, and a grainery to store grain.

 

Today the homestead still stands as the center of operations for our family farm and it shows how we have adapted to keep up with the ever changing world of farming.  Recently we have expanded operations to include land in Johnson County Missouri.  Grain crops are grown on the original homestead in Barton County Kansas and transported to Holden Missouri where they are milled and packaged.  We are very excited to expand our family farm from a solely commodity based farm to include production to consumer goods.

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FRESHLY GROUND FLOUR WITH NO CHEMICALS, ADDITIVES, BLEACHING AGENTS, OR PRESERVATIVES

Historically, flour whitening was done ‘naturally’ by allowing the freshly-milled wheat to sit for 1-2 months and get exposed to oxygen. That process became impractical due to required investment in time, space and contamination prevention.  During the 1800's many millers would ind their flour had spoiled before they could get it delivered to the consumer. 

Today that hurdle has been overcome since consumers have instant availability to products and goods.  As such, we believe it is important to turn back time and provide a healthier and better tasting flour to the consumer without all of the chemical additives and bleaching agents used in traditional commercial production.

Flour is used in so many facets of our diet that we can sometimes fail to realize how much flour we ingest daily and yearly.  In 2019, the average flour consumption per person in the United States was 130.7 lbs.  As our consumption of flour increases, so to does the amount of additives used during the flour milling process.

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